You are currently browsing the monthly archive for June 2009.

  1. What did I learn in God’s Word this week?
  2. Is my need for prayer or my burden for praying growing or diminishing?
  3. Does my heart break for the things that break the heart of God?
  4. Have I grown comfortable with the sin in my life?
  5. Am I doing ministry because of an overflow of God’s work in my heart or out of my own strength of will to do it?
  6. Has my teaching and ministry deepened, changed, or evolved in a positive way in the last year?
  7. Do I have a sincere peace that I’m living an authentic life of spiritual integrity?
  8. Is my heart for people and God growing larger or is it shrinking?
  9. Am I closer to God today than I was a year ago?
  10. Do others comment that they can clearly see evidence of God’s love and work in my life?
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Finding Your Voice – Mark Batterson

One dimension of the journey toward authentic leadership is: finding your voice in other words, finding your niche, your groove, your unique contribution to the kingdom. I think many of us start out parroting others. We sound like someone else. Over time, however, we find our preaching voice or writing voice.

As a person goes through puberty, the voice deepens as the voice box enlarges. I think leadership is like that. The longer you lead – the deeper your voice gets. Think of it as gravitas, having a deeper quality of leadership.

One part of finding your voice is: identifying your life themes. C.S. Lewis said, “Every life is comprised of a few themes.” Over time you identify those unique God-given convictions that drive you. For example, there are ways of doing church that no one has thought of yet. That is one of my themes. A life theme isn’t something you know; it’s something you “ooze out of your pores”. It’s not something you define; “it’s something that defines you. It’s more than head-knowledge. It’s a gut-conviction.

Another part of finding your voice is: getting out of your comfort zone and getting into your confidence zone – where you have the courage to say some things that you know might step on some toes. If you want to see people dance, you’ve got to shoot bullets at their feet every now and then!

Finding your voice is having the courage to offend. It is saying some things that you know will cause people to say, “You didn’t just say that.” To which we respond, “Oh yes I did.”